Compelling content: (web site, blog, YouTube, social media and so on) Helpful, how-to’s, interesting, cool, viral (worth sharing), top ten lists.  Be educational, both with basic helpful tips and in how your business works.  See to see some helpful content Crutchfield provides to customers.  Whole Foods Market ( is an excellent example of what an awesome blog looks like. Most experts recommend using the url or as the address to your blog, but, if you are just starting out with a blog it’s okay to use a free one like or BlogSpot.  Whatever platform you are using, blogs, Youtube, social media; do not push out a sales message, it’s more about being informative and helpful.  I've repeated this several times, it's so you will remember.  Nothing wrong with promoting the business, but that’s secondary to sharing.  If you ever have trouble coming up with content ideas, pick a buyer segment that you are presenting to.  For example, a cell phone repair and retailer might write the top ten iphone tech tweaks for an advanced user and helpful hints for a beginner.  When you start a blog or make videos, it’s about demonstrating thought leadership, illustrating that you know what you’re doing.  The results of an active web presence is a lot of content, a better search ranking, and some new customers.  It’s also good to refer someone to a blog post or video you made about something that is a common issue, “Oh, I made a video on how to set up your email with the iphone, here’s the link.”  All of the content you put out also helps target ideal customers.  Remember, everyone is not your ideal customer.  You should build an ideal customer profile like the FBI does with serial killers.  It sounds a bit crazy, but you really should understand who your ideal customer is.  John Jantsch talks a lot about this topic in The Referral Engine

A web site’s existence doesn't equal effectiveness, such as traffic, interest, awareness, or lead conversion. Most online tactics, whether it’s Facebook or a blog, take tender loving care to raise and grow. In fact, it’s pretty much like having a pet. When was the last time you didn’t feed, walk, or pay any attention to your dog for a week, let alone a single day? Just like your Doberman, your Facebook page needs nurturing.  A fleshed out web site is nothing more than a shell, or as commonly referred to in the world of new marketing, an online brochure. A Facebook page updated about as frequently as you get your oil changed is not so much a point of attraction as it is a rotting piece road kill. A stagnant social media presence in particular is more of a detriment than an advantage.  

An anesthetized Facebook page or Twitter feed isn’t attracting anyone. It also offers apprehension from a consumer perspective. The last thing you want is someone to question your credibility, capabilities, or even existence as an organization. Create, aggregate/share, and inform your customers with information relevant to them.  Ask yourself how can you help. Is there is advice or technical information that can be offered? How can you entertain your followers? Making a short, fun video (quality, or even rapidity, of the content often trumps overproduced, stale videos). Even a quick 30-second snippet from an event you hosted is well worth sharing. Upload photos, and then upload more! Tell the story of your business. Short on ideas? Ask your followers, post a query on Facebook or Twitter.

Lastly, cultivate interaction: two-way communication. Don’t talk “at” people (that’s the old way of doing things) talk to them, and engage. Respond to comments and questions; initiate the conversation. You must stay determined in taking care of your online presence. Feeding your dog when it’s most convenient is most careless.

Don’t worry if you’re unsure about what exactly to share at first or are intimidated by the tech talk. Most people who call themselves “social media experts” are experts at pretending to be an expert and much of the technical lexicon is gobbledygook. There is no more powerful tool available in the marketing arsenal, no bigger bang for your buck, than a compelling web presence.